Day in the Life of a Typical Japanese Office Worker in Tokyo

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Living in Japan and working in a Tokyo office – This is a Tokyo day in the life of a Japanese Office Worker, 24 year old, Emi. This is also a tour of her Japanese office, Pasona. We start this typical day in her Japanese home, commute via train to her Tokyo office in Otemachi and spend a day in the life of Emi at her working place. We see her typical working hours in Japan and how it is working in Japan as a female in her position. Her day in the life in Japan may be a bit different than some Japanese salarymen, but her experiences in the office with chorei, senpai / kouhai, and kenshu is a very typical in experiences in many Japanese offices. If you want to know how work in Japan or want to know how work in Tokyo, this could be how your job in Japan could be like. The Tokyo office itself, is probably an above average Japanese office in terms design and the business culture a bit more progressive than most traditional Japanese companies, but this Japanese company still maintains a very traditional Japanese office environment. So all in all, this is an example of Japan life as well as Tokyo life if you were to work in a Japanese company. You should always be aware of Japanese culture when working in a Japanese office. This Japanese office has a gym, English school and even a farm all in the building. Pasona is one of the largest staffing services company in Japan. There’s about 4000 staff in her office alone and about 9000 in total worldwide.

Pasona Office – Map Link

Offices:
– Japan: 113 Pasona Group offices (even more if we include our subsidiaries)
– Worldwide (including Japan): around 400

Global Locations:
– 58 sites in 15 regions.

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29 COMMENTS

  1. Find me on Instagram: PaolofromTokyo & Toe-Kyo Merch – https://teespring.com/stores/paolofromtokyo
    As a Typical Japanese Worker in the video, you'll see that Emi:
    – still lives with her parents (very common)
    – still works for the same company she started with after graduating university
    – takes baths at night
    – doesn't have a lot of time for breakfast before work
    – commutes to work 1 hour one-way everyday by train
    – arrives to work early before company hours
    – sits in an open seating environment with co-workers and mangers all sitting together
    – attends the traditional company morning meeting, called Chorei (very Japanese)
    – receives Omiyage from co-workers who came back from trips
    – performs regular desk and PC work throughout the day (as you would expect)
    – attends planing meetings as required for her job throughout the day
    – takes a 1-hour lunch break with co-workers
    – respects company seniority and uses the appropriate language to address her superiors
    – leaves the office when she finishes her work. On this day, she finished her work on time when on other days she may have to stay behind…as you can see other people in the office still remained since they didn't finish their work yet.
    – meets up with the girls after work to have a dinner / drinks
    – All of the above is what you could expect to see in a day of a "Typical Japanese Office Worker" or "Salarywomen in Japan"
    Let me know in the COMMENTS if you DISAGREE.
    LIKE if you want to see more Day in the Life Japan videos.

  2. Prolly an autolocking door on her home? She just ran off straight as she opened the door to leave, guess the camera man can stay home?

  3. Ok, it should be common to clean up after yourself in any casual eating environment. If it's a restaurant where you get served, obviously that's different, but every time I go to a fast food place or a mall food court and people leave their garbage behind, it annoys me so much. Especially since the person who's most likely to clean it up is the customer who sits there next.

  4. Now this is a kind of place where I'd love to work. Everything and everyone are so kind.
    Though this rare nowadays.

  5. You can practice your English … SHOULD have that in America

    I hear alot " I DON'T KNOW " or they say nothing at ALL 2 YOU!!!!!!

  6. In the office I work it's all an open space. There aren't that many of us in the office and now with Covid-19 there's even less. It's nice because we can talk with everybody without getting off the seats. Portugal, btw.

  7. this is very interesting office worker life in japan
    there are so many cool things to experience while you attend there
    it's something very decorative in japan

  8. Looks like my life when I was still in China a few years ago, also had a mini humidifier on my office desk. I miss those working days.

  9. American companies could learn a lot from this company . I worked for tthe oldest and largest public relations company in Washington, DC. We had a lunchroom the size of a bathroom and free coffee. That was the extent of amenities. No effort to create any satisfaction and many bosses who expected you to donate your lunch hour to running personal errands, get tickets for visiting friends to tour the whitehouse and give up your evening plans at the drop of a hat. And the pay was less than the average file clerk was making for the honor of working there.

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